The proof is in the partnership: NAFSA, APLU, and INTO analysis finds universities with recruitment/pathway partners are more likely to see international enrollment growth

The release of the Institute of International Education’s annual Open Doors data this week made for sobering reading among the American higher education community.  Before we provide our take on the findings, we want to offer some key context to the declines we saw in 2019/20. 

Continue reading “The proof is in the partnership: NAFSA, APLU, and INTO analysis finds universities with recruitment/pathway partners are more likely to see international enrollment growth”

Orientation overhaul: INTO virtually welcomes 2020 cohort to US amidst COVID-19

INTO The University of Alabama at Birmingham’s new student cohort participates in the center’s first virtual orientation.

When the COVID-19 crisis pushed US universities to close campuses and move courses online six months ago, one could scarcely imagine that the fall 2020 semester would find new students starting classes from behind their computer screens.

Even so, the student experience teams at INTO’s US centers have quickly adapted to support students through the unimaginable since the start of the pandemic.  Earlier this month, they overhauled orientation to virtually welcome a new cohort of international students to their respective universities.

Continue reading “Orientation overhaul: INTO virtually welcomes 2020 cohort to US amidst COVID-19”

COVID-19 in Context: Only the Strong Survive?

Polar Bear
Image by 272447 from Pixabay

 

Last month, Moody’s released an investor update headlined,   “Universities with strongest brands, significant scale, highest debt levels best positioned for coronavirus challenges.”  While that may be true for the strongest universities, the increased demand for higher education that will inevitably follow the COVID-19 pandemic means that institutional relevance and the agility necessary to respond to shifting market dynamics will be just as important as scale of brand and strength of the balance sheet when it comes to survival.

Continue reading “COVID-19 in Context: Only the Strong Survive?”

INTO North America: Year in review

As 2019 concludes, those in the international education community in the United States have much to reflect on.  In November, the Institute of International Education’s (IIE) 70th Open Doors Report revealed that it has been a uniquely challenging year for international student enrollment.  Although the nationwide decline in new international student enrollments (NSEs) slowed from -6.6% in 2017/18 to -0.9% in 2018/19, 51% of American higher education institutions reported a decrease in NSEs in 2019.

For INTO’s 12 American university partners, however, there were a great deal of international student enrollment and education milestones in 2019—proof that there is every reason to believe things can only get better in the American international education realm.

Continue reading “INTO North America: Year in review”

Open Doors – the secret sauce of partnership

It’s that time of year again. The Institute of International Education Open Doors project has published its comprehensive overview of international students studying the United States. This year’s report records the largest rise in international enrollments for 35 years, increasing by 10 per cent over last year and recording close to one million students.

Indeed, the most recent SEVIS by the Numbers report from August 2015 indicates this number has already been exceeded. The data also comes hot on the heels of Australian reports which indicate that demand for international education continues to grow.

Continue reading “Open Doors – the secret sauce of partnership”

Measuring the impact of international partnerships

A recent feature in UK magazine, Education Investor estimated that INTO is the market leader in terms of volumes of international students attracted to the United States pathway sector.

In this piece, we explore some of the numbers and the data we have used to calculate the impact of our partnerships in the United States and the United Kingdom. These are drawn from public sources and can be used by colleagues throughout the sector to measure their own performance.

This blog focuses on three elements of impact; enrollment growth, student outcomes and wider economic impact. The detailed case studies for Oregon State University (OSU), University of South Florida (USF) and Newcastle University also cover student diversity and student experience measures. Continue reading “Measuring the impact of international partnerships”

Buoyant demand for traditional destination countries, according to global agent poll

Traditional destination countries can expect to see more international students in the coming year according to a survey of more than 750 student recruitment organizations from 69 different countries.

The poll, conducted in March 2015 by INTO University Partnerships indicates that the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and Canada will all see an increase. Perhaps most surprisingly, for those based in the UK at least, is that 72 per cent of those surveyed believe they will be sending more students in the coming 12 months.

The annual survey also reveals the importance of service for counsellors and the link to employability as a key motivating factor for students wishing to study overseas. Continue reading “Buoyant demand for traditional destination countries, according to global agent poll”

Bringing the world to campus

This week, George Mason University announced a new initiative aimed at increasing the number of international students  by about 50 percent.  Currently, we have nearly 2,000 international students from 125 countries.

Over the next year, our new pathway programs will help increase that number to more than 3,000. These additional students won’t come at the expense of in-state or domestic out-of-state students, as we plan to grow our enrollments in all categories over the next decade.

Continue reading “Bringing the world to campus”

Forecasting is a precarious business, but how bright is the future for international education?

In 1964, the science fiction author and Boston University academic Isaac Asimov (pictured, right) imagined the world the world 50 years ahead (2014), in an article published in the New York Times. Surprisingly, he did quite well. He forecasted the advent of Skype and Face Time. He hinted at the wireless world and flat screen televisions. But he was wide of the mark on a range of other areas – that routine jobs would all but disappear; that we would live a life of enforced leisure.

Continue reading “Forecasting is a precarious business, but how bright is the future for international education?”

Charles Clarke: Developing skilled knowledge workers – The role of international collaboration

Globalisation is the unavoidable reality of the modern world.

People move and migrate.

Technologies, techniques and production methods are transferred across the planet in an instant. Economies are becoming less and less closed, more and more part of the international trading system.

There are fewer and fewer national scientific secrets. Scientific knowledge is almost universally available. Events in one corner of world become constant news in every part of the world.

Continue reading “Charles Clarke: Developing skilled knowledge workers – The role of international collaboration”