Open Doors – the secret sauce of partnership

It’s that time of year again. The Institute of International Education Open Doors project has published its comprehensive overview of international students studying the United States. This year’s report records the largest rise in international enrollments for 35 years, increasing by 10 per cent over last year and recording close to one million students.

Indeed, the most recent SEVIS by the Numbers report from August 2015 indicates this number has already been exceeded. The data also comes hot on the heels of Australian reports which indicate that demand for international education continues to grow.

Continue reading “Open Doors – the secret sauce of partnership”

Measuring the impact of international partnerships

A recent feature in UK magazine, Education Investor estimated that INTO is the market leader in terms of volumes of international students attracted to the United States pathway sector.

In this piece, we explore some of the numbers and the data we have used to calculate the impact of our partnerships in the United States and the United Kingdom. These are drawn from public sources and can be used by colleagues throughout the sector to measure their own performance.

This blog focuses on three elements of impact; enrollment growth, student outcomes and wider economic impact. The detailed case studies for Oregon State University (OSU), University of South Florida (USF) and Newcastle University also cover student diversity and student experience measures. Continue reading “Measuring the impact of international partnerships”

Buoyant demand for traditional destination countries, according to global agent poll

Traditional destination countries can expect to see more international students in the coming year according to a survey of more than 750 student recruitment organizations from 69 different countries.

The poll, conducted in March 2015 by INTO University Partnerships indicates that the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and Canada will all see an increase. Perhaps most surprisingly, for those based in the UK at least, is that 72 per cent of those surveyed believe they will be sending more students in the coming 12 months.

The annual survey also reveals the importance of service for counsellors and the link to employability as a key motivating factor for students wishing to study overseas. Continue reading “Buoyant demand for traditional destination countries, according to global agent poll”

Bringing the world to campus

This week, George Mason University announced a new initiative aimed at increasing the number of international students  by about 50 percent.  Currently, we have nearly 2,000 international students from 125 countries.

Over the next year, our new pathway programs will help increase that number to more than 3,000. These additional students won’t come at the expense of in-state or domestic out-of-state students, as we plan to grow our enrollments in all categories over the next decade.

Continue reading “Bringing the world to campus”

Forecasting is a precarious business, but how bright is the future for international education?

In 1964, the science fiction author and Boston University academic Isaac Asimov (pictured, right) imagined the world the world 50 years ahead (2014), in an article published in the New York Times. Surprisingly, he did quite well. He forecasted the advent of Skype and Face Time. He hinted at the wireless world and flat screen televisions. But he was wide of the mark on a range of other areas – that routine jobs would all but disappear; that we would live a life of enforced leisure.

Continue reading “Forecasting is a precarious business, but how bright is the future for international education?”

Charles Clarke: Developing skilled knowledge workers – The role of international collaboration

Globalisation is the unavoidable reality of the modern world.

People move and migrate.

Technologies, techniques and production methods are transferred across the planet in an instant. Economies are becoming less and less closed, more and more part of the international trading system.

There are fewer and fewer national scientific secrets. Scientific knowledge is almost universally available. Events in one corner of world become constant news in every part of the world.

Continue reading “Charles Clarke: Developing skilled knowledge workers – The role of international collaboration”

Internationalisation – the key component of Employability

Earlier this year McKinsey, the global consulting firm, produced a hard hitting report on Education to Employment. The report describes a global paradox: crippling levels of youth unemployment around the world – close to 50% in Southern Europe and the Middle East, yet 40% of employers surveyed claiming an equally dangerous shortage of appropriately qualified staff. The report also forecast a global shortage of up to 85 million skilled workers by 2020. To quote from their report:

“Employers, education providers, and youth live in parallel universes. To put it another way, they have fundamentally different understandings of the same situation. Fewer than half of youth and employers, for example, believe that new graduates are adequately prepared for entry-level positions. Education providers, however, are much more optimistic: 72 percent of them believe new graduates are ready to work..

Continue reading “Internationalisation – the key component of Employability”

It Ain’t What You Do

During a lull in a long meeting over the summer, a couple of colleagues at INTO were wrestling over our “elevator pitch” – what makes us distinctive. And we then broadened it out to think about ways in which universities can communicate their distinctiveness, a word appearing on many people’s lips across the sector. It’s difficult  when there is so much change and much analysis is unremittingly bleak.

The first years of this decade have brought us funding challenges on both sides of the Atlantic, the emergence of the discerning customer, disruptive market entrants to higher education, confusing and poorly executed government policy on student visas and so on.  It’s not easy being a traditional university in this environment. Moreover, after years of steady and quota-secured growth in tertiary enrolments, universities are facing serious structural challenges as various quasi-markets are created by government policy. The squeezed middle is very real.

Continue reading “It Ain’t What You Do”

Comprehensive internationalisation: the power of partnerships

internationalisationINTO’s Director of Academic Affairs for the USA, JoAnn McCarthy, has recently co-authored a paper on internationalisation in the educational industry. In this blog she gives an overview of the paper and her thoughts on international study.

A complement to John K. Hudzik’s earlier publication, “Comprehensive Internationalization: From Concept to Action”, this most recent joint effort, entitled “Leading Comprehensive Internationalization: Strategy and Tactics for Action,” provides practical guidelines for starting, sustaining, and evaluating a comprehensive internationalisation agenda in a wide range of institutional types. Continue reading “Comprehensive internationalisation: the power of partnerships”

Engineering change in US higher education through public/private partnerships

INTO USFAn increasing number of higher education institutions in the United States are now financially unsustainable and debt-ridden according to a new report that surveyed almost 2,000 private and public schools from consulting company Bain & Co. and Sterling Partners, a US-based private-equity firm.

University debt in the US is increasing annually at 12 per cent per year with the report attributing gross financial mismanagement and a lack of sustainable business models as two damaging factors. Continue reading “Engineering change in US higher education through public/private partnerships”